Discovered ! Amazing Benefits of Vitamin D3 for Eye and Vision Problems

Many people suffer from various visual related problems. The following findings by Dr. Mercola will probably shed some lights on how vitamin D3 can benefit people with vision problems.

When most people think of nutrients and eye health, they immediately think “vitamin A. or beta carotene.”

However, new evidence suggests that vitamin D may be more crucial.

New research from the Institute of Ophthalmology at University College London revealed striking eye benefits from vitamin D3 supplementation in older mice.

Specifically, after receiving the supplement for just six weeks. Improvements included:

Improved vision
Reductions in retinal inflammation and levels of amyloid beta accumulation, which is a hallmark of aging
Significant reductions in retinal macrophage numbers and marked shifts in their morphology (macrophages are immune cells that can cause inflammatory damage)
The findings suggest vitamin D3 may very well help prevent age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which is the most common cause of blindness in the elderly. AMD is associated with both amyloid beta accumulation and inflammation, and vitamin D supplementation appears to benefit both of these conditions.

Researchers concluded:

“These changes were reflected in a significant improvement in visual function, revealing that vitamin D3 is a route to avoiding the pace of age-related visual decline. Excess amyloid beta deposition and inflammation are risk factors leading to age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the largest cause of blindness in those older than 50 years in developed countries. Recently, vitamin D3 has been linked epidemiologically to protection against age-related macular degeneration. Hence, vitamin D3 enrichment is likely to represent a beneficial route for those at risk.”

As researchers noted, separate research has also implicated vitamin D deficiency in the development of macular degeneration, with those whose vitamin D intake was among the top one-fifth of participants having a 59 percent lower risk of developing AMD compared to women whose intake was among the lowest fifth.1